Tag Archives: Teaching

When Images “Lie”: Critical Visual Literacy | Digital Is …

When Images “Lie”: Critical Visual Literacy | Digital Is …

following my own advice

I haven’t had much time to blog lately because of all of my dissertation work. For a while I found that the blogging was helping my writing process, but then I got a little freaked out about the possibility that the blogging was taking me away from my work. Of course I’ve been feeling guilty about not blogging. Part of that is because I want to be true to my readers (though they may be few) and another part of the guilt is that I actually enjoy blogging. Then there’s the fact that I study bloggers. Perhaps the most important reason is that I continually encourage my students to write informally as a way to prepare themselves for formal writing. I require students to write low-stakes, informal reading responses and post them to their class blogs as a means of practicing. Writing is one of those activities that improves only through much practice, an opinion that I continually emphasize to my students. Yet I have been failing to follow my own advice, a practice that I often complain about when others do so. If you’re going to preach it, you should practice it. While I’ve been writing drafts of blog posts, I haven’t been completing or publishing them, a practice that would cost my students grade points. So, I vow to spend time (at least weekly) writing (and completing) posts for my blog. If nothing else, I’ll post about my dissertation. Perhaps that will alleviate the guilt I feel on both ends.

A Tech Blog for Teachers

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education today discusses a blog set up by two professors, Jason B. Jones, a professor at Central Connecticut State University, and George H. Williams, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina Upstate.  The article includes an interview with Professor Jones.  Their blog, ProfHacker, which includes posts from a variety of contributors, discusses the use of technology in higher education. The most significant aspect of this blog, in my opinion, is that it discusses more than the tools and their uses; the writers also discuss the relevance of these tools to pedagogical goals. Ultimately, the site provides links, reviews, and tutorials for using technology in higher education.  As someone who integrates technology in the classroom and is careful to ensure that these technologies meet pedagogical goals rather than just fueling my excitement over new technologies, I believe this site will be a useful tool to those who already use technology in the classroom, helping them to keep up to date on new tools.  Even more importantly I think this site is a good starting point for instructors less familiar with the integration of technology in the classroom. The tutorials and information provided by the site contributors provide a great introduction to the tools and ideas for successful integration. Kudos to ProfHacker!